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The Top 5 Hockey Cards from the 1950s

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  • The Top 5 Hockey Cards from the 1950s

    I have been paying a lot of attention to the cards from the 1950s recently, so I decided to make this following list:


    1) 1951 Parkhurst #66 Gordie Howe
    2) 1958 Topps #66 Bobby Hull
    3) 1951 Parkhurst #4 Maurice "Rocket" Richard
    4) 1955 Parkhurst #50 Jacques Plante
    5) 1953 Parkhurst #27 Jean Beliveau


    Notes:
    - Some of the oddball cards, such as the Royal Desserts Gordie Howe, Murray's Potato Chips Stan Mikita, etc., do sell for big money, however, due to their rarity, I have decided to exclude them from this list.
    - Demand for well-centered high grade Bobby Hull rookies remains very high and these cards do sell for more than the Gordie Howe rookie. However, I don't feel that this card deserves to be in first place yet.
    - There are some cards that have been performing poorly and have dropped in rankings. The 1951 Parkhurst #61 Terry Sawchuk rookie is one that comes to mind. A beautiful well-centered PSA 8 example recently went for only $2,300 USD, which is very disappointing.
    Last edited by Puck_That; 07-08-2018, 03:53 PM. Reason: Edited to add arrows

  • #2
    That seems about right...great decade for cards

    Comment


    • Puck_That
      Puck_That commented
      Editing a comment
      Thank you, Anish.

  • #3
    1954 Topps Gordie Howe cards have been doing well lately..1954 Topps is a nice looking set, and one of my faves from the 50's..

    Comment


    • Puck_That
      Puck_That commented
      Editing a comment
      The 54' Topps Gordie Howe definitely belongs in the top 10, but not top 5.

  • #4
    I have decided to add up/down arrows to my list. I have done this so all of you have an idea as to which direction a particular card has been going over the years. More details below:

    - For many years the 1951 Parkhurst Rocket Richard was in second place (just below the Howe), but it has been knocked down to third. I have not been impressed with the prices this card has been bringing in and high grade examples have only increased by a little.

    - The 1955 Parkhurst Jacques Plante is another one that continues to impress me. This card has definitely gone up in popularity/value over the years, and there are many reasons for this. In my opinion, this is probably the most attractive- looking goalie card in the hobby. This is a condition sensitive card due to the red border and this has resulted in high demand for beautiful examples. It also seems to me that majority of people out there believe he invented the goalie mask (he didn't.)
    Last edited by Puck_That; 07-08-2018, 04:22 PM.

    Comment


    • #5
      Tim Horton Rookie in a close #6 place ?? Great Rookie to own IMO

      Comment


      • #6
        Originally posted by DanTheVintageMan View Post
        Tim Horton Rookie in a close #6 place ?? Great Rookie to own IMO
        That is correct, my friend. The 1952 Parkhurst #58 Tim Horton is in 6th place. I think the popularity of this card is mostly due to his restaurant business. I know, I know, it sounds ridiculous, doesn't it? But it's true. Everyday millions of Canadians say his name. His early death also helped. He wasn't even the greatest defenceman to play in his era. Was he better than Doug Harvey? Nope. What about Eddie Shack? Probably not.

        Comment


        • #7
          Originally posted by Puck_That View Post

          That is correct, my friend. The 1952 Parkhurst #58 Tim Horton is in 6th place. I think the popularity of this card is mostly due to his restaurant business. I know, I know, it sounds ridiculous, doesn't it? But it's true. Everyday millions of Canadians say his name. His early death also helped. He wasn't even the greatest defenceman to play in his era. Was he better than Doug Harvey? Nope. What about Eddie Shack? Probably not.
          He wasn't better, but players just hated playing against him. He was a beast. When he hit you, it hurt a hell of a lot more than others.

          Comment


          • #8
            Doug Harvey was the best of his era. Just look at his stats: in 19 seasons he was an 11-time All-Star, 7 Norris Trophies & won 6 Cups.
            Horton played 24 NHL seasons, was a 6-time All-Star & won 4 Cups. Certainly not as good as Harvey but not too shabby.
            For comparison Eddie Shore played 16 seasons, was on 8 All-Star teams, won 4 Hart Trophies & was on 2 Stanley Cup winners.
            Denis Potvin Played 15 seasons, was a 7-time All-Star, 3 Norris Trophies & 4 Cups.
            All Hall of Famers.
            My point is simply that it's not quite fair to say Horton wasn't as good as Harvey. Who was?
            Sure - Bobby Orr (12 seasons, 9 All-Star selections, 8 Norris Trophies & 2 Cups).
            Tim Horton was popular for more than his doughnuts. If you saw him play, like Damir says, he was a beast, a guy you wanted on your team.
            The comparison to Eddie Shack (a forward not a defenseman) was, I assume, sarcasm. Entertaining to watch, beloved by fans but not in the same class as Horton.

            Comment


            • #9
              Oh man! I always thought that Eddie Shack was a defenceman! Thanks for pointing it out to me, ViewFromStLou.

              Comment


              • #10
                As an aside, it would enrich this post if you specified your criteria. I assume it’s card value, but the order of these cards varies depending on condition.

                It may be interesting to have an all-time top X as well. Excluding short prints it’s probably something like:
                1923 Morenz
                1911 Vezina
                1966 Orr
                1951 Howe
                Etc

                Comment


                • #11
                  That's why I had to look at the big picture here. I didn't want to create this list based on PSA 8 sales, because that would give collectors the wrong idea about these cards.

                  Creating an all-time list for any sport is just a complete waste of time (I'm pretty sure you remember all our past discussions on here). I think it is really difficult trying to compare cards from different eras. Should a C56 Newsy Lalonde be on the list and not a 1965 Topps Tony Esposito? Why or why not? If we can all agree on the top cards from each decade, then that is good enough for me.

                  Comment


                  • Billyberu
                    Billyberu commented
                    Editing a comment
                    Phil Puck Phil!

                • #12
                  I guess I don’t see your logic here...If the cards are ranked based on value in some condition, as I assumed, then comparing across eras isn’t an issue; you just state the condition (say EX) and look at sales in that condition. Obviously pre-war cards will have lower pops, but scarcity is part of what makes them valuable.

                  If you are not relying solely on value, then what keeps the 54T Howe from being on your list? I just think you should clarify your criteria.

                  Comment


                  • #13
                    Originally posted by Anish View Post
                    I guess I don’t see your logic here...If the cards are ranked based on value in some condition, as I assumed,
                    I didn't rank these cards just based on one condition; I tried to look at all the grades. So let's look at the Howe and Hull cards, for example. From POOR to EX-MT, the Howe sells for more. It's only at NM when the Hull starts outselling the Howe. I also tried to pay attention to how much a card's value has been increasing by over the years. You will notice that the 1951 Parkhurst Sawchuk is not on my list, and this is because while most postwar cards have gone up in value, it seems to me as if this one is going the opposite direction. Some other criteria I looked at was player popularity and individual accomplishments. Howe won six Hart trophies and six Art Ross trophies. He also won the cup four times. Beliveau may have won 10 cups as a player, but he only won Art Ross once and Hart twice. Hull won the cup only once and has two Harts and three Ross. And finally, I had to look at my own experience as a seller. Howe rookies sell very fast (regardless of condition). I've sold them to collectors in Canada, USA, Germany, Czech Republic, etc. Collectors just love them.

                    Creating an all-time list would be tough, especially based on all the criteria I used. Furthermore, prewar lovers will expect more tobacco cards to be on the list (and postwar collectors won't agree with this).

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